Bad Mortgages Hit Lowest Level Since 2008

The number of U.S. mortgages that were behind on their payments or in foreclosure in March fell below the 5 million mark for the first time since 2008, according to a report released Tuesday.

The number of loans in the foreclosure process fell to just below 1.69 million in March, the lowest level in nearly four years, according to Lender Processing Services. That was down by almost 20% from one year ago. Overall, around 3.4% of all U.S. mortgages were in foreclosure at the end of March, down from 4.2% a year ago.

Foreclosures have been falling because fewer borrowers are falling behind on their payments and because banks have been more aggressive about modifying loans or approving short sales, where properties are sold before the bank completes foreclosure.

Another almost 3.31 million loans were behind on their payments in March, with around 1.47 million of those that had missed at least three payments. The level of delinquent loans was down by 3% from a year ago, with around 6.6% of all borrowers in some stage of delinquency, excluding those in foreclosure.

Delinquencies tend to fall in March because homeowners use year-end bonuses and tax refunds to help catch up on their mortgages.

Before the housing crisis, around 5% of borrowers were delinquent on their mortgages and another 1% of loans were in foreclosure. The latest data show that while delinquencies and foreclosures are moving in the right direction, it’s probably going to take a few more years before delinquencies and foreclosures get back to pre-crisis levels.

For more information visit http://www.mortgagessiny.com

Advertisements

About mortgagelendingstatenisland

I am a mortgage banking veteran with over 15 years of experience at every level of the mortgage arena. I am known as the "closer" because of my troubleshooting skils and ability to explain in detail to my clients and business partners "What Makes A Mortgage Approvable".

Posted on April 23, 2013, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: