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Fixed Mortgage Rates Inch Up Slightly

Freddie Mac today released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates rising slightly from last week following positive news for housing starts and building permits.

News Facts

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 4.47 percent with an average 0.7 point for the week ending December 19, 2013, up from last week when it averaged 4.42 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.37 percent.
  • 15-year FRM this week averaged 3.51 percent with an average 0.6 point, up from last week when it averaged 3.43 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 2.65 percent.
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.96 percent this week with an average 0.4 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.94 percent. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.71 percent.
  • 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.57 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.51 percent. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.52 percent.
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Fannie and Freddie Overhaul Mortgage Insurance Master Policy Requirements

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have completed a major overhaul of their master policy requirements for private mortgage insurance the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced today.  The changes meet one of FHFA’s 2013 Conservatorship Scorecard goals for the two government sponsored enterprises (GSEs), aligning their individual policy requirements.  The changes are the first made to the master policies in many years FHFA said

 

Private mortgage insurance is required of borrowers who provide less than a 20 percent downpayment on a home purchase.   While the premiums are paid by the borrower, the insurance covers losses for the lender or the loan’s owner should the homeowner default on payments.  Mortgage insurance master policies specify the terms of business interaction between seller-servicers and mortgage insurers.  FHFA said the GSEs have worked with the mortgage insurance industry to identify and fix gaps in the existing master policies and the new policies will, among other things, facilitate timely and consistent claims processing.

 

The changes include a requirement that the master policies support various loss mitigation strategies that were developed during the housing crisis to help troubled homeowners and establishes specific timelines for processing claims, including requests of additional documentation.  The changes also seek to address a frequent source of complaints from homeowners, setting standards for determining when and under what circumstances the mortgage insurance must be maintained or can be terminated.  The changes are also designed to promote better communication among insurers, servicers, and the GSEs.

 

“Updating the mortgage insurance master policy requirements is a significant accomplishment for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac,” said FHFA Acting Director Ed DeMarco. “The new standards update and clarify the responsibilities of insurers, originators and servicers and they enhance the insurance protection provided to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which ultimately benefits taxpayers.”

 

The changes will be incorporated by mortgage insurance companies into new master policies which will be filed with state insurance regulations for review and approval.  FHFA said it expects the master policies will go into effect in 2014.

 

Andrew Bon Salle, Fannie Mae’s Executive Vice President, Single-Family Underwriting, Pricing, and Capital Markets said of the changes, “Mortgage insurers are an important part of the mortgage finance system and these changes help lay the foundation for a stronger system going forward. These updates will help us better manage our credit risk, which we believe will ultimately benefit Fannie Mae, mortgage insurers, homeowners and taxpayers.”

Freddie Mac Signs $77 million Risk Share Agreement

 

Freddie Mac has signed a risk sharing agreement with Arch Reinsurance Ltd. Which will cover up to $77.4 million in possible credit losses from a pool of single family loans.  The agreement is similar to one announced last month between Fannie Mae and National Mortgage Insurance Corporation to cover $5.0 billion in risk.

 

This new insurance coverage is another initiative by Freddie Mac to meet a strategic goal set for it and Fannie Mae (the GSEs) to transfer at least $30 billion of its single-family mortgage risk to private sources of capital.  The Freddie Mac/Arch contract involves a portion of the credit risk of loans funded in the third quarter of 2012.

 

“This is part of our business strategy to expand risk-sharing with private firms, thus reducing taxpayers’ exposure to losses from mortgage foreclosures,” said David Lowman, executive vice president of single-family business for Freddie Mac. “We have brought to the market new sources of capital for transferring mortgage credit risk away from taxpayers. We’ve tapped into the global insurance community’s appetite for U.S. mortgage credit exposure, and would like to do more of these policies in the future.”

 

Freddie Mac has sought to further meet the strategic goals, set for the GSEs by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) with two STACR debt offerings, the first of which closed in July and the second of which was priced last week.

Mortgage Rates Hit 4 Month Fixed Low

Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) today released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing average fixed mortgage rates hitting their lowest levels since this summer amid market speculation that the Federal Reserve will not alter its bond buying purchases this year.

News Facts

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 4.13 percent with an average 0.8 point for the week ending October 24, 2013, down from last week when it averaged 4.28 percent. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.41 percent.
  • 15-year FRM this week averaged 3.24 percent with an average 0.6 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.33 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 2.72 percent.
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 3.00 percent this week with an average 0.4 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.07 percent. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 2.75 percent.
  • 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.60 percent this week with an average 0.5 point, down from last week when it averaged 2.63 percent. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 2.59 percent.

Housing markets about to get squeezed

Some communities will likely be hit harder by mortgage loan limits

 

A plan to lower the cap on federally backed mortgages may hit home buyers particularly hard in several pockets of the country, new data shows.

 

The Federal Housing Finance Agency plans to reduce the maximum size of mortgages backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac this January. The current limits are $417,000 in most parts of the country and up to $625,500 in more expensive markets. The agency hasn’t announced how much it will lower loan caps, but data compiled for MarketWatch by Lender Processing Services, a mortgage-data tracking firm, shows that a decline of just $25,000 from the current caps would impact hundreds of thousands of home buyers in middle-priced and upper-middle-priced housing markets — areas that are relatively upscale but far from the most expensive. “You are really talking about communities that are comfortably well-to-do; you’re not talking about communities with large numbers of hedge fund managers and the like,” says Robert Hockett, a professor of law at Cornell Law School with expertise in real estate finance.

 

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In total, more than 214,000 of the agency-backed mortgages originated last year were within $25,000 of the current caps, according to LPS. For the first six months of this year, the number was just over 95,000. By one measure, they’re most in demand in Cook County, Ill., where 10,510 mortgages originated in 2012 and 4,137 during the first six months of this year were within $25,000 of current cap levels — the highest number in any county nationwide, according to LPS. In contrast, Manhattan, which has some of the most expensive real estate in the country, had just 1,187 and 460 of such large loans, respectively, for each time frame.

 

Nationally, these loans have accounted for less than 3% of all Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages given to borrowers during this time, though the share is much higher in some regions. In Colorado, North Carolina and South Carolina as well as in the District of Columbia, they account for more than 5% of agency mortgages that borrowers signed up for last year. They had over a 10% share in three Colorado counties, Boulder, Denver and Gunnison, during the first half of this year.

 

A greater number of borrowers could be impacted if mortgage caps drop by a larger amount. Housing experts say a $25,000 drop is likely conservative, and if the real cut is bigger, more borrowers will be left with fewer mortgage options going forward.

 

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgages weren’t always so generous. They were mostly capped at $417,000 until 2008, when legislation increased their loan limits in more expensive markets, and by late 2011 they settled at the levels currently still in place. The moves were meant to stimulate home buying and lending in the wake of the housing downturn. As private investors fled the mortgage market, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac took their place and have since been buying most of the mortgages that lenders have been providing to borrowers. Higher caps on federally backed mortgages allowed more buyers, who might have otherwise been unable to buy a home, to qualify for those loans.

 


Now that the housing recovery is gaining steam, the government is trying to reduce its role in the mortgage market. A spokesperson for the FHFA says that the agency “shares the administration’s view that a gradual reduction in loan limits is an appropriate and effective approach to reducing taxpayers’ mortgage risk exposure, shrinking the footprint of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the marketplace, and expanding the role of private capital in mortgage finance.”

 

But analysts caution that lowering their caps could have a domino effect on home sales. Many borrowers who use the maximum dollar amount of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loans tend to live in high-cost areas and rely on these mortgages to buy homes. If they’re unable to get financing, given that the private mortgage market is more selective, sales could stall and prices as a result may drop, says Jack McCabe, an independent housing analyst in Deerfield Beach, Fla. “This will be a real eye-opener,” he says.

 

In some areas, it would take just a small number of buyers to shake up home sales: In Cape May County, N.J., just 313 mortgages within $25,000 of the agency caps were given out during the first six months of the year, and they accounted for nearly 11% of all agency mortgages given in that time in the county. In Garrett County, Md., it was just 26 mortgages, which accounted for almost 8%.

 

The change would also come at an inopportune time for buyers: With home prices rising in many markets, experts say, it’s likely that a growing number of buyers will need larger-size mortgages.

 

To get a mortgage, most of these buyers will have to turn to private lenders, which include banks, credit unions, and independent mortgage lenders, who originate mortgages to borrowers on their own terms and either hold them on their books or sell them to a small number of private investors. But private lenders have been very selective over the past few years, lending mostly to affluent borrowers with large down payments who are buying multi-million-dollar homes. In many cases, these borrowers have the cash to buy their home outright.

 

It remains to be seen whether these lenders will open up to more borrowers. “If the private market doesn’t step in to take borrowers who are less than perfect, then those are the people who are going to be on the losing end of this,” says Georgette Chapman Phillips, professor of real estate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.